Unpacking Urbanism

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Unpacking Urbanism is a series of short courses taught by IIHS faculty and advisors which will engage with the theories and debates of urban practice. Through a curated set of master classes, courses and case studies, the series will unpack central ideas and frameworks that affect how we understand the urban.

The course series offers a diverse range of programmes such as:

  1. Master Classes that unpack key ideas and concepts within disciplines of urban practice.
  2. Courses on specific subjects which put concepts and practices into conversations with each other.
  3. Re-imagining the ‘World-class’ City – a five day intensive programme that re-examines the ideas that drive and aim to drive urban growth.

Rooted in the complexities of urban India, the series ensures learning opportunities both for those seeking to explore the urban as well as those wanting to deepen existing knowledge.

Unpacking Urbanism begins in November 2014 with courses in Bangalore and Delhi. A full calendar of course offerings will be announced soon.

Master Classes
The master classes are 3 hour sessions which are free for public and will be conducted in a seminar format. These sessions will be a critical exploration of the various dimensions of ideas that are understood in different ways. The master classes seek to raise questions, open debates, and challenge our understanding of different facets of the urban.

For registration, kindly fill up the form on the right. There are limited seats available for the master classes and participants will be shortlisted based on their application. The master classes are held from 5-8 pm. Free and open to all.

Thinking Mobility: Gender and Transport | 12 April 2016

Course Description
There has been increased attention to women’s safety in public transport and public spaces since 2012. The accounts of sexual violence in the public sphere and Nirbhaya’s death in December 2012 galvanized action by civil society and different levels of government in creating safer public transportation systems. However, there is a limited understanding of the inter-relationships between gender and transport as current interventions predominantly focus on prevention of spectacular incidents of violence.

  • How are urban transportation systems, infrastructure and institutions gendered?
  • How can we understand gender inequity in urban transportation?
  • What kinds of initiatives have cities in India and globally undertaken and what can we learn from them?

This interactive master class provides an overview of the literature on gender and transport globally and focuses on the initiatives, gaps and case studies in making our urban transport systems gender equitable.

Who Should Attend
This master class will be relevant for:

  • Students of urban studies and transportation planning.
  • Professionals across civil society, government and the private sector.
  • Anyone interested in gender equitable cities.

Schedule

Session 1 (5:30pm to 6:30pm) Session 2 (7:00pm to 8.00pm)
Interactive session on the concepts and frameworks around gender and transport Interactive session on the existing practices in India, international cases and learnings

Faculty
Sonal Shah

Important Dates:

MASTERCLASS DATE LAST DATE FOR REGISTRATION VENUE
12 April 2016 | 5:30 pm – 8:00 pm 7 April 2016 IIHS Bangalore City Campus

Let The City Feed You | 19 February 2016

How can the city that you’ve grown up in or moved to fuel your writing? What are the ways in which you can let your city awaken your writing? Are ideas really all around you? How can you rethink ‘busy’ to ‘full’ in a way that allows you to write all the time?

Come join an action-packed workshop, that takes you from a little idea to a finished piece.

Faculty
Nisha Susan

Important Dates:

MASTERCLASS DATE VENUE
19 February 2016 | 3:30 pm – 6:15 pm IIHS Bangalore City Campus

An Introduction to Urban Studies | 12 & 17 February 2016

Brief Description
What is a city – a geographic entity? A culture? A place? An economy? A set of infrastructures? A built environment? What makes cities “urban”?  Are the city and the urban distinct? Can a village not be “urban”; a city not be “rural”? What of the often head term: the “peri-urban”?

Canonical and contemporary debates within urban theory have long grappled with the city-ness of places, built environments, cultures and even economies. A range of different disciplinary traditions and practices have asked and answered this core inquiry differently. Together, they underlie what is loosely called “urban studies” or “urban theory.”

This Masterclass introduces the questions that define the field of urban studies to those new to it. It maps the terrain of what it means to study the urban, how different disciplines have come to it, and what the problem space of “urban theory” is. It suggests to learners of different disciplinary backgrounds, practice domains, and interests how they can find their own way to urban studies and locate their own interests and inquires within it.

Key Learning Outcome

  • An introduction to key concepts and inquiries in urban theory
  • A mental map of directions, ideas, and authors to explore further

Who should apply?
This Master Class is best suited for learners new to the idea of urban studies looking for an introduction that will then help them explore this terrain further.  Learners within any disciplinary training and professionals from any practice background are welcome to apply.

The Master Class can take about 25 applicants and admission is competitive. Admissions will be curated to ensure a diversity of disciplinary and practice backgrounds. All admissions will be at the instructors’ discretion.

Faculty
Gautam Bhan

Important Dates:

MASTERCLASS DATES LAST DAY FOR REGISTRATION VENUE
12 February 2016 10 February 2016 The Attic, Delhi
17 February 10 February 2016 IIHS Bangalore City Campus

Ways of Seeing – A workshop on De-Constructing Images and Meaning | 12 January 2016

Description:
We have images all around us today. Everywhere we look, there is a visual language which enables communication. Therefore, it is important for us to understand how to read images, read through their placements, and read how we understand them.

The ‘Ways of Seeing’ workshop highlights the importance of observing and absorbing the minute details that create telling images. Understanding the grammar of the language of photography alone cannot produce an image that can communicate effectively. Participants will learn and sharpen their skills of creating compelling stories using processing tools and methods, which aids in making an image more powerful than it was when acquired and in the context of where it will be used. The process of creating an image starts with an idea, it is captured using technique and technology and is complete when it is processed, if necessary, and finally, presented to the right audience. During the course of the workshop, participants will understand how aesthetic choices give meaning to an idea, captured visually as an image, and how its placement in particular contexts can create or change meaning.

Learner Profile:

  • Amateur/mid-level photographers, photography students, professionals who want to engage in deliberating about photography and its aesthetics in contemporary forms
  • Anyone who is interested in creating visual narratives and wants to build on their skills, by engaging in a discussion around the form and method of telling narratives using the image (some experience in photography preferred)

Current Challenges:

  • Technical tutorials are in abundance, however, resources around aesthetics and storytelling fall short
  • Maximising the potential of the medium and oneself to tell stories through pictures
  • Minimal understanding/appreciation of the history behind the art of photography, and the connection between this history and the current applications of photography

Learner Achievements:

  • Understanding and appreciation of the pillars that founded photography
  • Ability to use the medium to tell stories through photo essays/ photo sets
  • Knowledge to use photography for various purposes, such as documentary photography, photojournalism, landscape photography, architectural photography etc.
  • Ability to choose and select the appropriate method of shooting for a particular purpose, for a specific narrative or piece that one will work on

Pedagogy:
The workshop will be a mix of theory, discussion and appreciation of past and contemporary photographers’ work. We will look at various photographers’ work and place them in a variety of contexts to discuss the changes that happen to narratives around us when the context of the images changes.

Lesson Plan:

Session 1 (5 PM – 6 PM)
Understanding Master Photographers’ work | Images in context
Current debates around representation

Break (6PM – 6:15PM) 

Session 2 (6:15 PM – 7:00 PM)
Discussion and Review – Images in different contexts mean different things

Session 3 (7:00 – 8:00 PM)
Practical Exercise
Placing the images in a variety of contexts and observing how their meaning changes when they are placed differently

Faculty
Kunal Deshpande
Yashodara Udupa
Zohrab Reys Gamat

Important Dates:

MASTERCLASS DATE VENUE
12 January, 2016 | 5 PM – 8 PM IIHS Bangalore City Campus

Are Cities from the Global South adapting to climate change? | 19 November 2015

Brief Description

Working Group II’s contribution to the Fifth Assessment Report of the IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change) released in November 2014, included for the first time, a review of urban areas (Chapter 8) and rural areas (Chapter 9). This was in recognition of the fact that in addition to natural and managed resources and systems such as freshwater, oceans and food production systems, human settlements and the economic sector are also directly exposed to climate change impacts and will need to adapt across different scales.

In this master class, Sumetee Gajjar,  contributing author of Chapter 8, will share adaptation research and practice from 4 Southern Cities (Durban and Cape Town in South Africa, Dar es Salaam in Zanzibar and Mexico City) using a city systems framework. Learners will be encouraged to extend this framework to Bangalore and reflect upon the merits and challenges of applying such a frame to motivate climate adaptation in Indian cities.

Key Learning Outcome

  1. A systems framework for understanding the vulnerability of cities
  2. Examples of adaptation practice in Southern Cities
  3. Challenges in adopting a systems framework for climate adaptation in Indian cities

Audiences

  • Level: Intermediate

Faculty
Dr. Sumetee Gajjar

Important Dates:

MASTERCLASS DATE LAST DAY FOR REGISTRATION VENUE
19 November 2015 | 5 PM – 8 PM 15 November 2015 IIHS Bangalore City Campus

What can Southern Cities learn from each other when planning for climate change? | 23 September 2015

Brief Description
This masterclass continues from Sumetee’s last class titled “Are Southern Cities Adapting to Climate Change?”. Sumetee practised as a public sector consultant for more than a decade in South Africa, in the domains of integrated strategic planning and performance management across national, provincial and local government.

In this class she discusses whether administrative structures and planning instruments at municipal level in South Africa, offer lessons for Indian Cities to tackle the interlinked challenges of urban development and climate change adaptation. The focus will be on municipal structures and processes in Durban and Cape Town in South Africa, and Bangalore and Surat in India.

Link
to Sumetee’s blog on ‘Are Cities in the Global South Adapting to Climate Change?’

Audience

  • Level: Intermediate knowledge of Climate Change, Adaptation and Resilience

Faculty
Dr. Sumetee Gajjar

Important Dates:

MASTERCLASS DATE LAST DAY FOR REGISTRATION VENUE
23 September 2015 | 5 PM – 8 PM 17 September 2015 IIHS Bangalore City Campus

Urban Rental Housing | 13 August 2015

Brief Description

Rented accommodation is one of the first and foremost enablers of households’ access to the urban economy. The market of rental housing in India is a high-frequency transaction market. Where is the demand for rental housing coming from, and who actually supplies it, in which form? What forms of relationships do landlords and tenants share, especially in low-income households and settlements?

This masterclass on rental housing will attempt to unbundle these questions and highlight some of the advantages of and inequities in the rental housing market. While there is official data available on the state of the rental housing market, the masterclass will open discussions around them in order to better grasp the layers of meaning behind this data. The masterclass will also cover a range of Indian and international policies and programmes on housing and rental housing in particular – identifying key features and their impacts and outcomes. In focus will be India’s recent and current programmes on urban housing at the central government level, such as the Rajiv Awas Yojana, the Pradhan Mantri Awas Yojana (Housing for All 2022), and other state government schemes.

Key Learning Outcome
Learners will gain:

  1. Insights into the processes of the rental housing market in urban India
  2. An understanding of the policy settings for rental housing in India and other locations
  3. An appreciation of the advantages and challenges of rental housing
  4. A framework on rental housing within which they can raise more research and practice questions.

Audiences

  • Level: Intermediate to advanced
  • Researchers and practitioners interested in urban housing issues
  • Researchers and practitioners looking at questions on public data, policy and programmes on housing in India

Faculty
Swastik Harish

Important Dates:

MASTERCLASS DATE LAST DAY FOR REGISTRATION VENUE
13 August 2015 | 5 PM – 8 PM 6 August 2015 IIHS Bangalore City Campus

Systems Thinking and Urban Public Health Management - The case of Surat | 28 July 2015

Brief Description

Planning for climate change resilience is one of the most complex challenges that cities face.  The resilience of Surat to the adverse health and wellbeing impacts of floods has been strengthened by formal and informal partnerships.  These partnerships have helped to understand and control the throughput of adverse effects in their own systems, thereby reducing the impact on dependent sub-systems.  Surat faced floods in 1994, 2006 and 2013.  The aftermath of each of these events have been a study in contrast from a health and wellbeing standpoint.  The 1994 flood led to a plague outbreak and global shame for the city, whereas the 2006 flood resulted in 90% of the city being flooded, an industrial economic loss of rupees 160 billion, and an outbreak of Leptospirosis.  In contrast, in 2013, though the amount of water that got released from the Ukai dam was similar compared to 2006, only 30% of the city was flooded and the case fatality rate due to Leptospirosis was at 6.2 compared to 11.3 in 2006.  The above result has come about through the maturing of partnerships between various stakeholders including the government (Surat Municipal Corporation & Surat Urban Development Authority), academia, citizens, NGOs, funding agencies, expert groups and the private sector.  A multi-stakeholder organisation such as the Surat Climate Change Trust is a unique outcome of such a process.

The Master Class will distinguish systems thinking and its application in urban service delivery, urban public health in particular.  Identified operational, situational and cultural enablers of such collaborations in the case of Surat will be discussed. Understanding these enablers has significant policy relevance to help design ‘systemic interventions’ that nurture multi-stakeholder collaboration towards creating safer and healthier cities.

Key Learning Outcome

  • Distinction between Analytical Thinking and Systems Thinking
  • Role of Systems Thinking in Urban Public Health Management
  • How Municipal Corporations can enhance service delivery through collaboration
  • Enablers of multi-stakeholder collaboration in the case of Surat

Audiences

  • Level: Intermediate.
  • Graduate or post-graduate students with some social science/humanities background in any discipline.
  • Practitioners in the (urban) development sector, particularly from municipal administration, public health, and human development.

Faculty
Sathish Selvakumar
Dr. Vikas Desai (On Skype from Surat)

Important Dates:

MASTERCLASS DATE LAST DAY FOR REGISTRATION VENUE
28 July 2015 | 5 PM – 8 PM 24 July 2015 IIHS Bangalore City Campus

Safe Access around Transit in Indian cities | 19 June 2015

Brief Description
Indian cities have seen massive investments to the tune of $15 billion directed towards various mass transit systems. Transit authorities and municipal corporations must make a concerted effort to provide safe access to these mass transit systems to increase its usage, thereby causing a modal shift to more sustainable modes of transport. Furthermore, given how India has the highest number of road deaths in the world, growing motorization rates in Indian cities increases the conflict on roads as pedestrians, bicyclist and automobile users jostle for space. Creating spaces for pedestrians and other non-motorized transport users to safely access public spaces and transit stations is critical to preserve and improve the urban experience in Indian cities.

This interactive session is based on the recently released WRI | EMBARQ India publication the “Safe Access Manual: Safe access to mass transit stations in Indian cities”.

Over this master class, the learners are going to be discussing the concepts of accessibility to mass transit systems and how it is implemented in Indian cities. The first half of the session discusses the complexity inherent in introducing such systems within the existing framework of urban transport. The second half of the session uses the case of Yeshwantpur in order to discuss the fragmented and contested nature of policy implementation.

Key Learning Outcome

  • The session will engage and inform participants about the various processes involved in the planning, developing, implementing and enforcing safe access to and around mass transit stations.
  • Participants in groups will explore the challenges involved in developing a safe access plan for a station area through a role-playing game.
  • The principles and processes of accessibility and integration of transport modes will then be discussed within the context of Yeshwantpur

Imagined Audiences

  • Government-administrators and implementors,
  • Private- practitioners, researchers and students

Faculty
Himadri Das
Sahana Goswami

Important Dates:

MASTERCLASS DATE LAST DAY FOR REGISTRATION VENUE
19 June 2015 | 5 PM – 8 PM 12 June 2015 IIHS Bangalore City Campus

Is there a Southern Urbanism? | 22 May 2015

Brief Description
The “southern turn” in urban studies has challenged the canon of “urban theory,” arguing that cities of the south – from Sao Paulo to Shanghai, Mombasa to Mumbai – lie unexplained by theories written in Chicago, New York and Paris. Theorising from these cities, a range of authors have begun to argue for a “southern urbanism.” This Master Class explores some of the key conceptual interventions that underlie this challenge, introducing learners to the debate and encouraging them to see what it means to theorise the urban from “here.”

Key Learning Outcome

  • Learners will engage with key recent debates in urban theory.

Audiences

  • Level: Intermediate/Advanced
  • Graduate or post-graduate students with social science/humanities background in any discipline with an interest in urban issues

Faculty
Gautam Bhan

Important Dates:

MASTERCLASS DATE LAST DAY FOR REGISTRATION VENUE
22 May 2015 | 5 PM – 8 PM 18 May 2015 IIHS Bangalore City Campus

Competitive Cities: Imaginations and Economics of Land and Real Estate | 18 March 2015

Brief Description
In urban economics, land dynamics are often analysed using bid-rent curves, which assess how land use and land rent interact and structure urban space. These curves are used to assess urban policies, such as zoning, greenbelts, rent control, etc. However, in using bid-rent curves, cities are imagined as relatively static ground on which land uses compete for effective rent—an imagination of the urban that is not sufficient to understand the dynamism of cities as economic growth machines and particularly inter-city competition for investments, in an age defined by aspirations of hypermodernity and globalization.

Cities often act as critical sites that shape policies, discourses and aspirations that have regional, national, even global relevance and need to be examined as such. This seminar-style master class will explore the idea of cities as competitive and strategic entities and focus on the importance that land and real estate have assumed in competitive urban dynamics in the Indian context. Urban land has become an important tool for negotiating with and attracting investment interest. Such land-based strategies affect the structure of the urban economy and restructure urban space. Real estate industry growth and peri urban parallel cities are some of the more visible outcomes. The class will discuss the significance of urban land and real estate in terms of how the national economy is structured, how it is growing, the strategic importance that knowledge economy sectors have assumed and ultimately how land, labour and capital, the three fundamental economic building blocks, relate to one another, within the urban economy.

Learning Outcomes

  1. Understand that the urban is a particular, critical and inter- related scale at which global, national and regional economic dynamics are played out
  2. Understand urban land and real estate both as economic resource inputs, as well as economic and social outcomes, implicated in inter-city competition for investors

Audience

  • Basic to intermediate level

This class would target anyone with a basic interest in the urban economy, real estate, land economics, who may also have some basic grounding in these fields. The class would highlight the possibilities of adopting a political economy approach to understand the urban economy and urban negotiations for investments.

  • Post- graduate students with an interest and possibly some basic knowledge in urban economics, real estate, land economics
  • Practitioners from the real estate sector or development sector interested in the political economy of current urban transformations

Faculty
Sudeshna Mitra

Important Dates:

MASTERCLASS DATE LAST DAY FOR REGISTRATION VENUE
18 March 2015| 6 PM – 9 PM 16 March 2015 New Delhi (To be Announced)

Is there a “Southern Urbanism”? | 16 March 2015

Brief Description
The “southern turn” in urban studies has challenged the canon of “urban theory,” arguing that cities of the south – from Sao Paulo to Shanghai, Mombasa to Mumbai – lie unexplained by theories written in Chicago, New York and Paris. Theorising from these cities, a range of authors have begun to argue for a “southern urbanism.” This Master Class explores some of the key conceptual interventions that underlie this challenge, introducing learners to the debate and encouraging them to see what it means to theorise the urban from “here.”

Key Learning Outcome

  • Learners will engage with key recent debates in urban theory.

Audiences

  • Level: Intermediate/Advanced
  • Graduate or post-graduate students with social science/humanities background in any discipline with an interest in urban issues

Faculty
Gautam Bhan

Important Dates:

MASTERCLASS DATE LAST DAY FOR REGISTRATION VENUE
16 March 2015 | 6 PM – 9 PM 11 March 2015 New Delhi (To be Announced)

Three Cities, Three Dharmas | 20 February 2015

Brief Description
We tend to think of the Ramayana as the story of a forest exile, a trying period of tribulation and loss in a place where marauding rakshasas and rakshasis hold sway, where magical deer dance dangerously beneath the trees, where monkeys fly and speak fluent Sanskrit. But the story of Rama, our exiled prince, is studded with cities, three of them, in fact: Ayodhya, Kishkindha and Lanka, inhabited by humans, monkeys and rakshasas, respectively. It is because the cities exist that life in the forest and the forest itself, is thrown into relief.

Because each of the cities is home to a different kind of being, each of them embodies and imposes a different kind of dharma upon its citizens, particularly its women. Each city persuades its people to behave in certain ways and in each of them, the dharma that the city holds within itself is pushed, pulled, challenged and eventually, transgressed.

The cities of the Ramayana give us the opportunity to examine the way dharma is created, upheld and broken within the text. They are both a physical and a metaphorical location in which we can explore ideas of right and wrong, personal and public, male and female.

Faculty
Arshia Sattar’s translations of the Valmiki Ramayana (1996) and Tales from the Kathasaritsagara (1993) are published by Penguin Books as is her collection of essays on the Ramayana, “Lost Loves: Exploring Rama’s Anguish.” (2011) which was short-listed for the Crossword Non-Fiction Award in 2012. She has also written three books for children, most recently, “Adventures with Hanuman” (Red Turtle,  2013). Her latest book, “The Mouse Merchant: Tales of Money in Ancient India” (Alan Payne, Penguin 2013) is a compilation of stories from Sanskrit texts about attitudes to money.
Arshia teaches classical Indian literatures at various institutions across the country, and along with DW Gibson, is the founder and director of Sangam House, an international writers’ residency program located outside Bangalore.


Important Dates:

LAST DAY FOR REGISTRATIONVENUE –IIHS Bangalore City Campus

MASTERCLASS DATES
20 Feb 2015

Randomized Evaluations in Public Policy | 19 February 2015

Brief Description
Randomised evaluations seem to be the gold standard when analysing the effect of any intervention or change in policy these days. With the use of carefully run experiments and a robust statistical design, economists claim to have been bringing greater scientific rigour in the understanding the process of economic development. With random allocation of the intervention aimed at specific population or region, researchers claim to have the most credible answers to important questions of public policy such as do food stamps work, does performance pay for teachers improve pupil learning outcomes, whether open defection leads to stunting amongst children etc. But the randomised evaluation methods are not without their criticism. Not only are they expensive in terms of time and money and may not reveal causation owing to confounding factors, there are a number of ethical and moral issues involved in carrying out these experiments.

This course will introduce participants to the concept of randomized evaluation, the kind of question it seeks to address and the ethical issues in carrying out these experiments. Participants would be exposed to the methods which are being increasingly used to address important questions of public policy in developing countries.


Key Learning Outcome
Better understanding around:

  • Why is the concept of randomisation essential to program evaluation?
  • How randomised evaluation is carried out by development economists?
  • Ethical issues involved in randomised evaluations


Imagined Audiences

  • Postgraduate students (any discipline)
  • Practitioners in the development sector (NGO officials) and policymakers (particularly those engaged in carrying out development schemes and are interested in their evaluation)


Faculty

Shriya Anand
Andaleeb Rahman


Important Dates:

MASTERCLASS DATES LAST DAY FOR REGISTRATION VENUE
19 February 2015 IIHS Bangalore City Campus

An Introduction to Economics of Climate Resilient Development | 11 December 2014

world-bank-logo1Brief Description
The recent IPCC AR5 has unambiguously highlighted and emphasized the challenges posed by global climate change. Increasing climatic variability is poised to exacerbate existing multi-dimensional risks on human, natural, and social systems, especially in developing countries where policymakers and practitioners seek to balance development goals with climate change mitigation and adaptation.

This course will introduce participants to the economic dimensions of climate change adaptation (one of the policy responses to climate change challenges). The session will give an overview of current climate change impacts and set the context for the need for adaptation (with a special emphasis on the impacts observed/projected in South Asia/India). It will discuss different economic tools that can be used to facilitate climate-resilient development and help countries move away from a business-as-usual development path towards a more resilient socio-economic pathway.

Key Learning Outcome
Better understanding around:

  • The need for moving away from business-as-usual to aligning development goals with climate change adaptation activities
  • An introduction to tools to prioritise adaptation options

Imagined Audiences

  • Postgraduate students (any discipline)
  • Practitioners in the development sector (NGO officials) and policymakers (particularly those engaged with implementing adaptation plans at the sub-national level)
  • Researchers working in the climate change space

Faculty
Amir Bazaz

Important Dates:

MASTERCLASS DATES LAST DAY FOR REGISTRATION VENUE
11 December 2014 4 December 2014 IIHS Bangalore City Campus

On Low-Carbon Cities | 9 December 2014

Brief Description
Global climate change has manifested itself in myriad forms such as negative impacts on certain key sectors like agriculture. Responding to the challenges posed by global climate change has been embedded in adaptation and/or mitigation actions/strategies. Cities, due to high concentration of economic activity & corresponding high energy input, contribute immensely to the global stock of Greenhouse Gases (GHGs). Cities in developing countries offer a unique opportunity to significantly alter the emerging high-trajectory GHG emissions profile and thereby contribute towards global mitigation efforts. Many ways/frameworks have been proposed worldwide towards changing the ways cities should function and contribute towards global GHG mitigation efforts. One of the emerging frameworks center around the concept of ‘low-carbon cities’. This class will de-mystify, debate, challenge the concept of low-carbon cities and probably, contribute towards an innovate framing of addressing conjointly the economic imperatives of cities and its contribution towards mitigating GHG emissions.

Key Learning Outcome
Learners will be able to understand the emerging low-carbon framing

Imagined Audiences

  • Level: Intermediate
  • Post-graduate students with any background
  • Practitioners in the (urban) development sector, particularly from CSOs, climate change and related departments (such as water) in cities, economic development, and human development.

Faculty
Amir Bazaz

Important Dates:

MASTERCLASS DATES LAST DAY FOR REGISTRATION VENUE
9 December 2014 2 December 2014 IIHS Bangalore City Campus

On Urban Informality | 12 & 28 November 2014

Brief Description
Studying the cities of the global south appears impossible without grappling with the idea of “informality.” Yet what does “informality” mean and is it a useful concept to understand the complexity of our cities? This class seeks to unpack the many lives, histories and meanings of “informality,” bringing together its spatial, economic, political and cultural conceptions. It poses informality against its others – “formal,” “unauthorized,” “corrupt,” “legal/illegal”— in order to ask what the concept allows us to do and, just as importantly, what distinctions it hides.

Key Learning Outcome
Learners will learn how to conceptually engage with different understandings and practices of “informality” across disciplines

Imagined Audiences

  • Level: Intermediate
  • Graduate or post-graduate students with some social science/humanities background in any discipline
  • Practitioners in the (urban) development sector, particularly from planning, economic development, and human development.

Faculty
Gautam Bhan

Important Dates:

MASTERCLASS DATES LAST DAY FOR REGISTRATION VENUE
12 November 2014 5 November 2014 Delhi – Venue to be decided
28 November 2014 21 November 2014 IIHS Bangalore City Campus

Understanding Urban Commons | 27 November 2014

Brief Description
Urban commons appear very frequently nowadays in academic, activist as well as policy domains of discourse and practice. What can be considered commons within the urban and what is urban about the common in these discourses are often diverse and perhaps even divergent in their conceptual framing. Further, its relationship with public the private and the neo-liberal deserves examination.

This course will examine the urban and the commons separately and examine the range of frameworks used to put them back together as urban commons. The participants will be encouraged to attempt to shape this conceptual domain in their own way.

Key Learning Outcome
Understand the diverse conceptual and theoretical framing of the urban, the commons and the urban commons and develop conceptual skills to contextualize the analysis of the urban geography from the perspective of urban commons.

Imagined Audiences

  • Level: Intermediate
  • Graduate or post-graduate students with some social science/ humanities/ Design background in any discipline
  • Practitioners in the (urban) development sector, particularly from planning, economic development, and human development – in government, NGO and Consulting or other Community organizations.

Faculty
JAYARAJ SUNDARESAN
PhD, Department of Geography, London School of Economics; MArch CEPT University; BArch Kerala University (CET)

Jayaraj is an Urban Ethnographer and a Human Geographer. Currently, he is a researcher at Grantham Research Institute for Climate Change and Environment at the LSE, London. His previous roles included founding director of a planning and design consultancy in India, advisor to the local government in Kochi on land management, consultant to the London Boroughs on economic regeneration, urban design and planning policy, researcher at the LSE Urban Age program (now LSE Cities), Lecturer in the Department of Architecture at the NIT-C, India, Teaching Assistant for human geography and planning courses  at the LSE and a post doc researcher at the DPU (UCL) on Future Proofing Indian Cities project.

Important Dates:

MASTERCLASS DATES LAST DAY FOR REGISTRATION VENUE
27 November 2014 21 November 2014 IIHS Bangalore City Campus



Short Courses Following the master classes, short courses will be conducted March 2015 onwards. Aimed at students, researchers, academics and practitioners, these short courses seek to explore and experience different approaches to various aspects of a city. The course aims to enhance and enrich the knowledge of the learners through case-based teaching, an in-depth study of seminal academic works, and the diverse experiences of IIHS faculty.

Geographies of Desire: Understanding the Urban Through Film | 13-15 March 2015

This course will look at the world of desire through films, as a way of understanding the urban. We will look at the many kind of urban narratives present in films – not only their stories, but the many tiny narratives of desire and emotion inside these stories that tell us something about life in the city. Taking off from these insights about cinema/cinematic storytelling desire and the urban we will create multi-media narratives of our own with stills, tiny video clips, basic graphics and text using mobile phones and computers. Click here for more information. 

Faculty: Paromita Vohra

Course Fee: Professionals: INR 8,000 | Students : INR 5,000

Important Dates:

COURSE DATES LAST DAY FOR REGISTRATION VENUE
13-15 March 2015 6 March 2015 IIHS Bangalore City Campus

Unpacking ‘Place’ | 11-12 April 2015


Re-imagining the ‘World-class’ City
March 2015
This course re-examines the idea of the ‘World-class’ City and the critical questions of urban growth and development that underpin them. Given India’s challenges towards enabling inclusive development, social transformation, sustainable urbanism and livelihoods, this is an intensely contested and opportune debate. The course brings together theoretical debates with existing practices, enabling an interdisciplinary exploration of the systems, processes and values that drive the development of these cities. Using a rich mix of lectures, practica, charettes and cases, the course is a dynamic and an engaged learning environment with participation at every stage.